Imaging and Radiation to Be Discussed at Anaheim Meeting

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将被谈论的想象和辐射在阿纳海姆会议上

Lynn Shapiro, Writer | July 15, 2009
(11:36 a.m. on Tuesday, July 28 in room 304A). More information: http://www.aapm.org/meetings/09AM/PRAbs.asp?mid=42&aid=11808.

RADIATION GUIDELINES
Updated recommendations for calculating and regulating the effects of radiation on living tissue were released in 2007 by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. Drawing on this report and a recent review by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Dr. Kimyata Morgan-Butler of the NRC will discuss some of the options for incorporating the latest scientific models used to assess risk and potential new limits on occupational radiation exposure into the regulations in the United States.
(2:54 p.m. on Wednesday, July 29 in room 211A). More information: http://www.aapm.org/meetings/09AM/PRAbs.asp?mid=42&aid=12169.

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SAFETY EQUIPMENT CAUSES BACK PROBLEMS
Radiation is not the only risk for medical professionals who use X-ray machines in the clinic or the laboratory. Cramped workspaces and the heavy protective gear and lead aprons worn by doctors, medical physicists, and support personnel can lead to orthopedic problems, according to the Multi-Specialty Occupational Health Group. Lynne Fairobent of the American Association of Medical Physicists will be discussing data from the Multi-Specialty Occupational Health Group detailing the magnitude of these health concerns.
(3:06 p.m. on Wednesday, July 29 in room 211A). More information: http://www.aapm.org/meetings/09AM/PRAbs.asp?mid=42&aid=12170.

ARE RADIOLOGISTS AT RISK?
Studies of people exposed briefly to high levels of radiation (e.g., the atomic bomb) have helped to establish the link between radiation and cancer, but their relevance to radiologists -- whose occupation brings them into contact with low levels of radiation for long periods of time -- is uncertain. Amy Berrington of the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health will present the results from and limitations of recent epidemiological health studies and predictions of cancer rates among radiologists and radiographers in the United States, China, and the United Kingdom, as well as new data from an ongoing study of physicians who perform fluoroscopic procedures, which use X-rays to visualize the inside of the human body in real time.
(8:30 a.m. on Thursday, July 30 in room 213A). More information: http://www.aapm.org/meetings/09AM/PRAbs.asp?mid=42&aid=11978.

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