New therapy option identified for early-stage breast cancer

New therapy option identified for early-stage breast cancer

Press releases may be edited for formatting or style | February 07, 2020 Molecular Imaging Rad Oncology Women's Health

"The increased magnitude of the bystander effect in this study suggests that higher injected activities may better sterilize undetected dormant or slow-growing DTCs in the bone marrow micro-environment.," said Howell and co-authors. "Thus, 223RaCl2 may potentially be an adjuvant treatment option for select patients at early stages of breast cancer.

They continued, "This study adds to the mounting evidence that radiation-induced bystander effects can play a role in in the design of future treatment plans for radiopharmaceuticals alone or combined with external-beam therapy. Furthermore, the capacity to target specific cells or tissues in a systemic manner may offer advantages over the use of external beams of radiation for eliciting therapeutic bystander responses."

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The authors of "Dose-Dependent Growth Delay of Breast Cancer Xenografts in the Bone Marrow of Mice Treated with 223Ra: The Role of Bystander Effects and Their Potential for Therapy" include Calvin N. Leung, Edouard I. Azzam and Roger W. Howell, Department of Radiology, New Jersey Medical School, Rutgers University, Newark, New Jersey; Brian S. Canter, Department of Radiology, New Jersey Medical School, Rutgers University, Newark, New Jersey, and Department of Orthopedics, New Jersey Medical School, Rutgers University, Newark, New Jersey; J. Christopher Fritton, Department of Orthopedics, New Jersey Medical School, Rutgers University, Newark, New Jersey; Didier Rajon, Department of Neurosurgery, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida; and Tom A. Bäck, Department of Radiation Physics, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.

This study was made available online in September 2019 ahead of final publication in print in January 2020.


About The Journal of Nuclear Medicine
The Journal of Nuclear Medicine (JNM) is the world's leading nuclear medicine, molecular imaging and theranostics journal, accessed close to 10 million times each year by practitioners around the globe, providing them with the information they need to advance this rapidly expanding field.

JNM is published by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI), an international scientific and medical organization dedicated to advancing nuclear medicine and molecular imaging--precision medicine that allows diagnosis and treatment to be tailored to individual patients in order to achieve the best possible outcomes.

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