New technology improves atrial fibrillation detection after stroke
advertisement
当前地点:
>
>
> This Story

Forward Printable StoryPrint Comment
advertisement

 

advertisement

 

Cardiology Homepage

Miracor Medical granted FDA breakthrough device designation for the PiCSO Impulse System

Cook Medical launches new 2.6 Fr CXI Support Catheter

Adagio Medical announces US FDA investigational device exemption approval for atrial fibrillation trial with cryoablation

Philips unveils HeartStart Intrepid with IntelliSpace Connect across Europe and select markets worldwide

FDA expands indication for several transcatheter heart valves

Edwards SAPIEN 3 TAVR receives FDA approval for low-risk patients

The power of 4D technology advances care for heart patients

AtriCure enters into definitive agreement to acquire SentreHEART

Ancora Heart enrolls first patient in European multi-center study of first-of-its-kind investigational heart failure therapy

First TAVR procedure performed at Henry Ford Macomb Hospital

New technology improves atrial fibrillation detection after stroke

Press releases may be edited for formatting or style
A new method of evaluating irregular heartbeats outperformed the approach that's currently used widely in stroke units to detect instances of atrial fibrillation.

The technology, called electrocardiomatrix, goes further than standard cardiac telemetry by examining large amounts of telemetry data in a way that's so detailed it's impractical for individual clinicians to attempt.

Story Continues Below Advertisement

Servicing GE/Siemens Nuclear Medicine equipment with OEM trained engineers

Numed, a well established company in business since 1975 provides a wide range of service options including time & material service, PM only contracts, full service contracts, labor only contracts & system relocation. Call 800 96 Numed for more info.



Co-inventor Jimo Borjigin, Ph.D., recently published the latest results from her electrocardiomatrix technology in Stroke. Among stroke patients with usable data (260 of 265), electrocardiomatrix was highly accurate in identifying those with Afib.

"We validated the use of our technology in a clinical setting, finding the electrocardiomatrix was an accurate method to determine whether a stroke survivor had an Afib," says Borjigin, an associate professor of neurology and molecular and integrative physiology at Michigan Medicine.

A crucial metric

After a stroke, neurologists are tasked with identifying which risk factors may have contributed in order to do everything possible to prevent another event.

That makes detecting irregular heartbeat an urgent concern for these patients, explains first author Devin Brown, M.D., professor of neurology and a stroke neurologist at Michigan Medicine.

"Atrial fibrillation is a very important and modifiable risk factor for stroke," Brown says.

Importantly, the electrocardiomatrix identification method was highly accurate for the 212 patients who did not have a history of Afib, Borjigin says. She says this group is most clinically relevant, because of the importance of determining whether stroke patients have previously undetected Afib.

When a patient has Afib, their irregular heartbeat can lead to blood collecting in their heart, which can form a stroke-causing clot. Many different blood thinners are on the market today, making it easier for clinicians to get their patients on an anticoagulant they'll take as directed.

The most important part is determining Afib's presence in the first place.

Much-needed improvement

Brown says challenges persist in detecting intermittent Afib during stroke hospitalization.

"More accurate identification of Afib should translate into more strokes prevented," she says.

Once hospitalized in the stroke unit, patients are typically placed on continuous heart rhythm monitoring. Stroke neurologists want to detect possible intermittent Afib that initial monitoring like an electrocardiogram, or ECG, would have missed.
  Pages: 1 - 2 >>

Cardiology Homepage


You Must Be Logged In To Post A Comment