DOTmed Home MRI Oncology Ultrasound Molecular Imaging X-Ray Cardiology Health IT Business Affairs
News Home Parts & Service Operating Room CT Women's Health Proton Therapy Endoscopy HTMs Pediatrics
SEARCH
当前地点:
>
> This Story


注册记数器 to rate this News Story
Forward Printable StoryPrint Comment
advertisement

 

advertisement

 

Business Affairs Homepage

IBM to pay $14.8 million to settle Maryland false claims allegations Settlement revolved around the 2011 acquisition by IBM of Cúram Software

Change Healthcare's IPO now heading beyond $1 billion Offering 49 million shares at $19 each

Silicon Valley investor paints dire picture for future of radiologists Claims they should no longer exist in a decade

Installing and removing imaging equipment is no small task Expert insights on how project management is evolving

Canon, Toshiba each hit with $2.5 million fine over acquisition deal Deal violated premerger notification and waiting period requirements

Ohio radiology services president indicted in Medicare scam Charged for services never provided and received nearly $2 million

GE likely to hold onto NY digital X-ray detector manufacturing plant — for now New York State facility employs 125 workers

Half of radiologists have net worth of $2 million or more New survey analyzed responses from over 20,000 physicians in over 30 specialties

Getting ahead of the digital health avalanche How can a health system know which innovative tools are worth its time?

Varian to acquire Cancer Treatment Services International for $283 million Enables production of multidisciplinary solutions

Follow-up imaging study points to benefits of automated notification

John W. Mitchell , Senior Correspondent
A failure to comply with imaging diagnostic follow-up exams has long been a concern for radiologists and primary and attending physicians. A lack of such compliance leads to poorer patient outcomes (even death), complications, and legal liability for physicians and hospitals.

A recently published study in the American Journal of Roentgenology concluded that monitoring of and adherence to follow-up imaging recommendations improves patient outcomes by mitigating risk. However, manual systems for such diligence have proven to be ineffective.

Story Continues Below Advertisement

Servicing GE Nuclear Medicine equipment with OEM trained engineers

We offer full service contracts, PM contracts, rapid response, time and material,camera relocation. Nuclear medicine equipment service provider since 1975. Click or call now for more information 800 96 NUMED



“Roughly 10 percent of all radiology reports contain follow-up recommendations for further imaging, which in a medium-sized practice can exceed 100 exams per day,” Thusitha Mabotuwana, lead author and senior scientist, Radiology Solutions at Philips told HCB News. “Manually tracking and ensuring follow-up is not practical or cost-effective, so we were interested to find ways to automate the process and reduce the burden on staff.”

The study team compared two institutions, the University of Washington and Lahey Hospital and Medical Center, to see if there were significant commonalities and differences in the patterns of follow-up behavior among their patient populations. They also reviewed the robustness of the automated system.

“Past experience has shown us that determining whether a patient has followed up can take between five and 15 minutes, depending on the complexity of the case,” said Mabotuwana, explaining the weakness in the standard practice of staff trying to get patients to comply with follow-up imaging exams. “If you count the time to notify the referring physician and/or patient, then this time investment per patient can reach 30 minutes.”

The study found that for most radiology exams at both institutions, the follow-up rate ranged from a high of 88 percent to a low in the mid-30 percent range, with an average of around 52 percent. The highest follow-up rates tended to occur for imaging studies that had formalized services, such as lung cancer or breast cancer screening programs.

The study also found that by deploying a follow-up algorithm, for example, it is possible to automate the discovery of radiologists' follow-up recommendations. This enables notification to the referring physicians and/or the patients to ensure that they are aware of any recommended follow-up exams. Based on the research, Mabotuwana thinks that for automated callbacks to be effective, such systems have to be robust and easy to integrate into the workflow in order to be accepted. Also, financial incentives would need to be aligned.
  Pages: 1 - 2 >>

Business Affairs Homepage


You Must Be Logged In To Post A Comment

Advertise
提升您的品牌知名度
拍卖+私人销售
获得最好的价格
买设备/配件
找到最低价格
每日新闻
阅读最新信息
目录
浏览所有的DOTmed用户
DOTmed上的伦理
查看我们的伦理计划
金子分开供营商节目
接收PH要求
金子服务经销商节目
接收请求
提供保健服务者
查看所有的HCP(简称医疗保健提供商)的工具
Jobs/训练
查找/申请工作
Parts Hunter +EasyPay
获取配件报价
Recently Certified
查看最近通过认证的用户
Recently Rated
查看最近通过认证的用户
出租中央
租用设备优惠
卖设备/配件
得到最划算
Service Technicians Forum
查找帮助和建议
简单的征求建议书
获取设备报价
真正商业展览
查找对设备的服务
对这个站点的通入和用途是受期限和条件我们支配 法律公告 & 保密性通知
物产和业主对 DOTmed.com,公司 Copyright ©2001-2019 DOTmed.com, Inc.
版权所有