dismiss

Clean Sweep Live Auction on Thur. March 28th. Click to view the full inventory

DOTmed Home MRI Oncology Ultrasound Molecular Imaging X-Ray Cardiology Health IT Business Affairs
News Home Parts & Service Operating Room CT Women's Health Proton Therapy Endoscopy HTMs Mobile Imaging
SEARCH
当前地点:
>
> This Story

starstarstarstarstar (1)
注册记数器 to rate this News Story
Forward Printable StoryPrint Comment
Advertisement

 

 

Rad Oncology Homepage

Four considerations before embarking on a carbon therapy center The next frontier in improving cancer care

Q & A with Scott Warwick, executive director of the National Association for Proton Therapy Find out what to expect at the year's biggest proton therapy industry event

New approach identifies lung cancer patients most likely to respond to chemotherapy Combines radiomics and CT image assessment

Aussies and Americans develop 3D models for assessing impacts of radiotherapy Test different levels and types of radiation

IBA tech plays first-time role in flash therapy demonstration Supports eventual integration of flash as clinical treatment

Access to proton therapy increasing for pediatric patients Young cancer patients have the most to gain from proton treatment

Public-private partnership replaces 50-year old radiotherapy equipment in Guatemala Upgrading to Varian Halcyon system

Hypofractionated radiotherapy no worse than conventional RT, says study No difference in progression and survival

Proton therapy market continues decline after 2015 high point: report By comparison, investment in 2018 dropped 62 percent

FDA approves Mirada Medical's Simplicit90Y Dosimetry software Speeding up planning and workflow for Y90 TransArterial Radioembolization

A law in Ontario prevents brachytherapy
patients from being cremated

Law in Ontario prevents cremation of brachytherapy patients

John R. Fischer , Staff Reporter
A law preventing the cremation of loved ones who underwent brachytherapy in life is wrong and should be eliminated, say cancer and radiation oncology experts in the Canadian province of Ontario.

A case involving the refusal of multiple funeral homes to cremate the remains of Al Monk, whose family was unsure if he had TheraSeeds implanted for prostate cancer treatment, has prompted many to speak out against what they call an “outdated” law, claiming that it deters patients from receiving what could be a necessary treatment.

Story Continues Below Advertisement

THE (LEADER) IN MEDICAL IMAGING TECHNOLOGY SINCE 1982. SALES-SERVICE-REPAIR

Special-Pricing Available on Medical Displays, Patient Monitors, Recorders, Printers, Media, Ultrasound Machines, and Cameras.This includes Top Brands such as SONY, BARCO, NDS, NEC, LG, EDAN, EIZO, ELO, FSN, PANASONIC, MITSUBISHI, OLYMPUS, & WIDE.



"It means that a fairly large group of people that have end-of-life plans that include cremation … are now not getting the best therapies that they might need," Curtis Caldwell, the chief scientist at the Radiation Safety Institute of Canada, told CBC News, adding that “about two years after this [brachytherapy] has been administered, you really need no precautions at all, no matter how much you treated the patient.”

Around 400 men in Ontario were treated with brachytherapy for prostate cancer in 2012, with the complete number reaching into the thousands annually. The most common form of brachytherapy involves the implanting of radioactive isotopes with a half-life of around 60 days. The total amount of radioactive material is then reduced by half every two months.

Along with Saskatchewan, Ontario forbids the cremation of human remains with nuclear substances, an issue that has caused many to seek other alternatives for laying their loved ones to rest, including shipping their remains to other countries that do not have such laws.

Supporters of the law argue that implants, such as TheraSeeds, put cremation operators at risk for radiation exposure and risk damaging crematorium equipment. Oncologists, however, say precautions such as wearing a mask, can protect against exposure.

The issue made headlines this past month in the Great White North when the family of Al Monk was told they could not bury him because they were unsure if he had received the form of treatment while battling prostate cancer. The family was turned away by multiple funeral homes, despite the fact that Monk had made all the preparations before his death and paid 2,124.40 Canadian dollars (US $1,590.33) to cover all costs associated with a basic cremation.

The family was shocked, as neither his doctors nor Highland Funeral Home, the place where he made his final arrangements, had informed them that such a law existed. Even the contract he signed did not specify it.
  Pages: 1 - 2 >>

Rad Oncology Homepage


You Must Be Logged In To Post A Comment

做广告
提升您的品牌知名度
拍卖+私人销售
获得最好的价格
买设备/配件
找到最低价格
每日新闻
阅读最新信息
目录
浏览所有的DOTmed用户
DOTmed上的伦理
查看我们的伦理计划
金子分开供营商节目
接收PH要求
金子服务经销商节目
接收请求
提供保健服务者
查看所有的HCP(简称医疗保健提供商)的工具
工作/训练
查找/申请工作
Parts Hunter +EasyPay
获取配件报价
最近证明
查看最近通过认证的用户
最近额定
查看最近通过认证的用户
出租中央
租用设备优惠
卖设备/配件
得到最划算
服务技术员论坛
查找帮助和建议
简单的征求建议书
获取设备报价
真正商业展览
查找对设备的服务
对这个站点的通入和用途是受期限和条件我们支配 法律公告 & 保密性通知
物产和业主对 DOTmed.com,公司 Copyright ©2001-2019 DOTmed.com, Inc.
版权所有