GBIS annual technical conference preview

GBIS每年技术会议预览

Diana Bradley, Staff Writer | August 17, 2012
From the August 2012 issue of HealthCare Business News magazine

Attendees to the Georgia Biomedical Instrumentation Society’s (GBIS) Annual Technical Conference will get the chance to hear first-hand from The Joint Commission on changes to critical care equipment’s preventive maintenance requirements. The event is being held from August 17-19, at the Wellstar Development Center in Atlanta, Georgia.

An engineer in The Joint Commission’s department of engineering, Michael Chisholm, is a featured speaker at this year’s event.

“The Joint Commission is well-known for its pivotal role in helping to maintain and raise the level of health care services in America, and we are always delighted to have one of their representatives address our membership,” says Horace Hunter, GBIS’ executive director. “And I am as interested as everyone to hear what he has to say on CMS’ ruling on PMs.”

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In addition, a representative from the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation’s (AAMI) Technical Management Council will offer a presentation. Educational sessions will take place throughout the two-day event, including a Biomedical Equipment Technician (BMET) Certification Review, along with classes on ultrasound and anesthesia services.

Attendees will also have a chance to meet with nearly 20 vendors and manufacturers in the exhibit hall.

The GBIS Annual Meeting and Banquet will be held Saturday, August 18 at the same venue, encompassing a brief business meeting, dinner, presentation of awards and entertainment. This event is to help support the mission of GBIS, administrative costs, charity organizations and develop a scholarship program.

“GBIS is focused on advancing the knowledge of personnel involved in the development, selection, operation, repair and support of biomedical instrumentation in health care institutions throughout the state of Georgia,” Hunter says. “Of course we have grown from that to also giving to charity organizations. This year we are supporting the AAMI scholarship and GBIS will also develop its own scholarship foundation. It’s all about giving.”

For more information, please see the Georgia Biomedical Instrumentation Society’s website: www.gbisonline.org, or to read an exclusive interview with Horace Hunter, visit DOTmed News Online and type DM19195 into the search window.

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